He Said, She Said – NLDS Winner Takes All Edition for 10/9/19

Prof: Two games played. Four teams enter. Only two can advance. Who are the best of the best, the beast and the least? We shall see…


 

Cardinals 13, Braves 1 (NLDS Game 5, Cardinals win series 3-2) – Prof: Yeah, well, it was bound to happen. When the core of your team is whiffing everything, and the leader of your team isn’t leading their way out of a paper bag, all while everyone and their dog is blaming the one guy who continued to show up at bat for making a very simple mistake…well. I might be a Braves fan, but I’m not an idiot. You have to play the game to win, and St. Louis called upon every perceived slight, every imaginary offense, and every scrap of Devil F’n Magic to win this game. Many altars to Jobu were in that away team clubhouse. But let’s talk about the actual game, folks.

In a record breaking performance, the Cardinals scored ten runs in the first inning and basically murdered any chances that Atlanta had of repeating the last time Folty and Flaherty met up. In fact, Mike Foltynewicz couldn’t even last the first inning – he had six earned runs and didn’t even last a full inning at all. Meanwhile, the Cards ace went six innings and struck out eight Braves. Firing on all cylinders. The worst thing? St. Louis didn’t hit a single home run in this massacre. Oh well. Let’s see who the Redbirds will match up against in the NLCS!

 

Nationals 7, Dodgers 3 F/10 – (NLDS Game 5, Nationals win series 3-2) – Scouts: Being that I live on the East Coast, I’m unable to stay up until 4am to watch a baseball game.  And with MLB apparently deciding they don’t care if people actually are able to watch their product this game ended sometime around the crack of dawn.  When I went to bed, the Dodgers had the game under control, and one would have been forgiven for assuming that the game would finalize with the Dodgers moving on to face the Cardinals.  Well, one would be wrong.  Things didn’t get off to a great start for Washington with Stephen Strasburg giving up three early runs thanks to homers by Max Muncy and Enrique Hernandez in the first two innings.  But somehow the Nats shut it all down from there, blanking L.A. the rest of the way.  Walker Buehler was dealing, holding the Nats to 1 run and 4 hits over 6.2 innings.  Who did the Dodgers turn to in their time of need?  Why none other than Clayton Kershaw.  That turned out disastrous as Kershaw was only able to mange a single out, all while allowing solo homers to Anthony Rendon and Juan Soto in the 8th.  The runs gave the Nats enough to send things into over time, and that’s when Howie Kendrick stepped up to the plate with the bases loaded against Joe Kelly.  It should be noted that at this time, Dodger closer, Kenley Jansen, who racked up 33 saves in the 2019 season, was sitting firmly on the bench.  Well, Joe Kelly coughed up a Grand Slam to Kendrick, and the Dodgers had a short trip home to being their off-season vacation.

19 thoughts on “He Said, She Said – NLDS Winner Takes All Edition for 10/9/19

  1. So who had money on the Nats bullpen throwing 4 scoreless innings in a winner take all game?

    Reading Prof’s 1st paragraph on the Barves/Redbirds recap with references to “play to win the game” and Devil F’n Magic I couldn’t help but think of this great moment in coaching press conferences, especially since Herm Edwards is now the coach of the Sun Devils. Coincidence? I think not….

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I prefer this version of the above video (sound on, please):

    Howie meant lots to this team this year, and was having a brutal series up till that point, so nice to see him get some redemption.

    I’m still in shock that the Nats won, not because they’re not talented (78-40 since May 24, including postseason) but because the main reason they won is that Dave Roberts vapor-locked, first by staying with Kershaw and then by staying with Kelly. Davey Martinez is apparently a good manager when it comes to the motivational stuff, but strategy has never seemed to be his long suit, and if you had told me that bad managerial decisions were going to be the difference in this series, I’d have been sure they would’ve cost the Nats, not the Dodgers.

    On to the NLCS for the first time, against the hated Redbirds. Nats have some worries about the health of Kurt Suzuki (HBP in the wrist and face) and Victor Robles (hamstring) and the overall performance of their bullpen, but Rendon and Soto appear to be heating up offensively, and if the Nats hit, they can paper over some pitching shortcomings.

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  3. I still believe Kershaw to be a pitcher of rare talent. In seven consecutive years, his CYA ranks were 3 #1s, 2 #2s, a #3, and a #5. add an MVP to the awards.

    His postseason performance has been much closer to a third or fourth starter. I don’t know the cause of that, but with over 150 postseason innings it can’t be a sample size variance. Gator mentioned a couple months ago that Trout might end up as the modern Ernie Banks, attaining personal success but never participating in team success. Kershaw, at this point, may be in similar position.

    Happy: I’m sorry the Twins didn’t do it for you! But man, it was a great ride, wasn’t it?

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    • Regarding Kershaw (and Scherzer), if you believe good hitting beats good pitching and vice versa, there’s something to be said for the idea that teams that make the post-season, as a rule, are good to great teams, likely to have relatively strong offenses.

      It follows then that teams good enough to make the post-season should achieve better than normal (for the pitcher) results against the pitchers they’ll face, while at the same time perhaps putting up worse than normal (for the team) offensive results. In simpler terms, when a playoff team that averages 5.5 runs per game faces a pitcher who gives up 2.75 runs per game, that team might score 4 runs against that pitcher because irresistible force/immovable object.

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    • Yeah it was a good ride, made better than the fact that it was totally unexpected. Looks like the Twins management might know what they’re doing – giving me a reason to keep waking up in the morning.

      And…inexplicably, my youngest GRANDSON is a Yankees fan, which makes me a begrudgingly , honorary Yankee’s fan through the end of the month.

      Baseball.

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