Marlon Byrd Suspended for PEDs

News out of Cleveland – veteran outfielder Marlon Byrd has failed a second controlled substances test and will be suspended for 162 games per Major League Baseball’s PED policy.

Byrd first failed a drug test in 2012 and received a fifty game suspension at the time. This time around, Byrd tested positive for secretagogue Ipamorelin, which is categorized as a growth hormone.

Here is Byrd’s statement.

Personally, I call poo on that, because a growth hormone isn’t something that’s generally included in supplements, especially a targeted one like Ipamorelin is supposed to be.

Byrd is 39 years old, will be coming off of a free agent year, and will still have a suspension to serve after the season is over. His career might be in jeopardy on the heels of this latest offense.

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16 thoughts on “Marlon Byrd Suspended for PEDs

    • Eh, that happens when you decide to swing harder.

      His K rate nearly doubled during that time as well. He just chose to become a different kind of hitter, he didn’t get better, just traded K’s and OBP for HR and ISO. With the exception of 2013, his SLG wasn’t even appreciably better than before the last few years and his wRC+ has been pretty much the same as before.

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      • Yes, it’s just that easy to completely change yourself as a hitter @ 35. Surprised more people don’t do it. The fact that his power spiked after his first hot piss test was purely a coincidence.

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        • I didn’t say it was easy. But there are plenty of guys who show this change as they get older, and some do it all of a sudden at any age. Some guys do the exact opposite, taming their swing to more contact but with less power.

          The fact that there are still people out there that think steroids have that big of an effect is kinda funny. Power is about balance, timing, and bat speed (which is caused by rotation), not just raw strength.

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        • Didn’t Jose Bautista suddenly decide to swing harder? There were plenty of chants about steroids. Doesn’t make it true. He simply changed his approach at the plate. I still have yet to see a single study that proves that steroids lead to increased homerun a. Especially not at the rate that most people claim. Now maybe they have a secondary effect by allowing a player to stay healthier longer or workout a little more often but it’s not some manic pill that grants you 25 home runs a year and can likely have a negative effect.

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  1. He’s 39 yo pro sports player. They make millions or they make nothing. I’d consider the odds of getting caught too if the alternative is to quit and make nothing. Consider that dilemma and you at least kind of get why he’d dare test fate again. That said, he’s a cheater cheater pumpkin eater.

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